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Jogging, Easy Does It

February 09, 2015

US News and World reported that some jogging is good for you, but that too much jogging may not be good for you. 

Researcher Jacob Marot at Frederiksberg Hospital in Copenhagen Denmark conducted the study of 5,000 healthy danish adults. 

"In this study, the dose of running that was most favorable for reducing mortality was jogging 1 to 2.4 hours per week, with no more than three running days per week"

"The best pace was slow or average -- about 5 miles per hour", Marot added.

Marott and his colleagues followed nearly 1,100 healthy joggers and 413 sedentary people for more than 12 years. The joggers recorded their time and frequency of jogging, and their estimated pace.

The strenuous joggers, the investigators found, were as likely to die during that time period as the sedentary non-joggers. Light joggers and moderate joggers fared better, in that order, Marott's team found.

The study has caused some controversy  in the kinesiology community. 

D.C. Lee one of the study's editorial's co-authors,  said "that a very small group logged the most jogging time. Just 47 joggers put in more than four hours a week, and only 80 ran more than three times a week. These small numbers could have affected the comparisons and results, Lee said.

Also, the researchers didn't look at more than 3,500 active non-joggers who exercised in other ways, Lee said. The researchers looked only at death from all causes, he said, instead of looking to see if high jogging miles and times affected certain causes of death, which could have given more specific information about potential harms.

"More [running] may be worse only in cardiovascular disease," he said. In another assessments on the effects of running and death rates, Lee's group found that death from all causes was lower in runners compared with non-runners, regardless of how much they ran, but there was a slight trend for less benefit from higher doses when compared with lower doses."

US News's article continues with much more analysis including more of the the study's details and the study's limiting factors here. 

For further current fitness studies visit Live Oak's blog.




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